Friday, September 20, 2019
   
Text Size

Site Search powered by Ajax

Introduction / Outline

Being riveted to Scripture while being relevant to our times is the needed balance of expository preaching—i.e., it is essential we learn to accurately exposit the culture and the Scripture and bring the two together in applicable preaching. This seminar will focus on a number of key ingredients central to the expository process which lead to pertinent steps of implementation in people's lives.
Seminar Members: Registration is voluntary, but it will be an encouragement to know who is interested in taking these sessions and where you are located.
Included are the following online sessions:
Session One: The Introduction to Expository Preaching.
Here we will attempt to answer several questions: What are the ingredients of expository preaching? What is a definition of expository preaching? What are its advantages, goals, difficulties? We'll talk about what expository preaching is not. We will conclude with practical suggestions. Here Now!
Future sessions will focus on how to begin expository preaching and/or to sharpen our skills.
Session Two: The Preparation and Process of Expository Messages
The main focus will be the 15-step process of preparing an expository message that is true to the text, and leads to specific steps of application. This session will include a discussion of the tools needed, and necessary commitments to expository preaching. We will conclude with some practical ideas on how to develop a balanced preaching schedule, and how to evaluate whether we are preaching too often. Here Now!
Session Three: The Personal Touch of Expository Preaching
Several expository styles and approaches will be viewed and compared, e.g., those of Ray Stedman, Charles Swindoll, John Stott, Jerry Cook. Examples of individual sermons, a whole series on a book, and individual topics will be viewed and evaluated. Coming
Session Four: The Principles of Interpretation
To conduct proper exegesis of a passage, we have to get in touch with some basic rules of interpretation. We are certainly not saying only scholars can understand the Bible; we should continue to emphasize what the 16th-century reformers affirmed (they called it perspicuity)—the way of salvation plainly set forth so that the simplest believer may read and understand it for himself. Yet the Word of God is rich in revelation too. Therefore, if we are to enter more deeply into God's Word, we must understand some basic rules. The history of the church also confirms the need for such a code to guide our interpretation. For instance, Paul warned the Corinthians against a false approach which corrupts the Word of God (2 Cor. 2:17), and commanded Timothy to handle Scripture accurately (2 Tim. 2:15). A number of resources will be used for this session. Here Now!
Session Five: A Potpourri of Expository Questions and Tests
The following are some of the questions that will be asked and answered in this session: How can I do topical studies accurately? How do we respond to finicky spiritual tastes? Should we teach others to evaluate our and others' messages biblically? How long into the future should I plan my preaching?
Sessions Six to Nine: The Process of God's Communication to Man
Part One: The Process Revealed; Inspiration
Part Two: Transmission, Translation  (This session is contained the second part of the Part One PDF file)
Part Three: Illumination, Interpretation
Part Four: Application  (This session is contained in the second part of the Part Three PDF file)
All Four Sessions Here Now! These four sessions will focus on how God has chosen to communicate truth to people. All have a dual use:
for the pastor/teacher/leader a review of some important information
presented, along with overheads, as in teaching a series to a local congregation
These sessions will help pastors/leaders to help their audiences/churches answer a lot of questions believers and nonbelievers ask: How do you know the Bible is God's Word? Isn't the Bible full of errors? How can we trust that what was originally God's Word hasn't been altered over the years with all the changes and translations that have been made? We will conclude with a lesson that gives an overview of the inductive process. Unlike the expository focus of this seminar, it is presented in a topical fashion.

Being riveted to Scripture while being relevant to our times is the needed balance of expository preaching—i.e., it is essential we learn to accurately exposit the culture and the Scripture and bring the two together in applicable preaching. This seminar will focus on a number of key ingredients central to the expository process which lead to pertinent steps of implementation in people's lives.

Seminar Members: Registration is voluntary, but it will be an encouragement to know who is interested in taking these sessions and where you are located.
Included are the following online sessions:

Session One: The Introduction to Expository Preaching.  Here we will attempt to answer several questions: What are the ingredients of expository preaching? What is a definition of expository preaching? What are its advantages, goals, difficulties? We'll talk about what expository preaching is not. We will conclude with practical suggestions. Here Now!
Future sessions will focus on how to begin expository preaching and/or to sharpen our skills.

Session Two: The Preparation and Process of Expository Messages The main focus will be the 15-step process of preparing an expository message that is true to the text, and leads to specific steps of application. This session will include a discussion of the tools needed, and necessary commitments to expository preaching. We will conclude with some practical ideas on how to develop a balanced preaching schedule, and how to evaluate whether we are preaching too often. Here Now!

Session Three: The Personal Touch of Expository PreachingSeveral expository styles and approaches will be viewed and compared, e.g., those of Ray Stedman, Charles Swindoll, John Stott, Jerry Cook. Examples of individual sermons, a whole series on a book, and individual topics will be viewed and evaluated. Coming

Session Four: The Principles of Interpretation   To conduct proper exegesis of a passage, we have to get in touch with some basic rules of interpretation. We are certainly not saying only scholars can understand the Bible; we should continue to emphasize what the 16th-century reformers affirmed (they called it perspicuity)—the way of salvation plainly set forth so that the simplest believer may read and understand it for himself. Yet the Word of God is rich in revelation too. Therefore, if we are to enter more deeply into God's Word, we must understand some basic rules. The history of the church also confirms the need for such a code to guide our interpretation. For instance, Paul warned the Corinthians against a false approach which corrupts the Word of God (2 Cor. 2:17), and commanded Timothy to handle Scripture accurately (2 Tim. 2:15). A number of resources will be used for this session. Here Now!

Session Five: A Potpourri of Expository Questions and TestsThe following are some of the questions that will be asked and answered in this session: How can I do topical studies accurately? How do we respond to finicky spiritual tastes? Should we teach others to evaluate our and others' messages biblically? How long into the future should I plan my preaching? 

Sessions Six to Nine: The Process of God's Communication to Man

Part One: The Process Revealed; Inspiration   
Part Two: Transmission, Translation  (This session is contained the second part of the Part One PDF file)
Part Three: Illumination, Interpretation 
Part Four: Application  (This session is contained in the second part of the Part Three PDF file)

All Four Sessions Here Now! These four sessions will focus on how God has chosen to communicate truth to people. All have a dual use:

  • for the pastor/teacher/leader a review of some important information
  • presented, along with overheads, as in teaching a series to a local congregation
These sessions will help pastors/leaders to help their audiences/churches answer a lot of questions believers and nonbelievers ask: How do you know the Bible is God's Word? Isn't the Bible full of errors? How can we trust that what was originally God's Word hasn't been altered over the years with all the changes and translations that have been made? We will conclude with a lesson that gives an overview of the inductive process. Unlike the expository focus of this seminar, it is presented in a topical fashion.